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Tales from death row: Justice for Rodney Reed by Caitlin Adams


Math equations are certainly not my strong suit, but I was able to calculate the total number of hours Rodney has been unjustly incarcerated. As of this writing, January 13, 2012, that is 5,398 days or 129,552 hours. Of those 129,552 hours, we can estimate (and this is the best case scenario) that 10,736 were outside of his 6x9 cell—in the visiting room, in the rec yard, or at the commissary.  118,816 hours were in isolation; the only company and distraction being a radio, letters, photos, magazines, books, or newspapers.  


How Many Blue Slips Does It Take To Get New Shoes?

Tales from death row: Justice for Rodney Reed by Caitlin Adams


The question posed in the title of this week's blog is very relevant on death row and the answer is disturbing—quite a few.  Rodney needs new shoes, which seems to have a simple solution, right? Let me attempt to describe the process involved and I'm willing to bet you won't ever see buying shoes in the same way again.

Rodney sends a blue slip to the Property Manager.  She responds with a white slip. Well, that's how it’s supposed to work.   Rodney has already sent three blue slips.  And no new shoes yet!  What's the hold up, you ask?


What's Cooking?

Tales from death row: Justice for Rodney Reed by Caitlin Adams


I have never doubted the ingenuity of human beings and it's always seemed a fairly accurate maxim that "necessity is the mother of invention".  At this week’s visit with Rodney, I learned just how true this saying is and how ingenious we human beings can be.  

The horrors stories about the food served TX death row inmates abound: mystery meats, extra protein in the form of various insects, mold, fungus, hair (human and not), unidentifiable substances, dirt, rat feces, and probably many more I haven't heard about.   


Kindness, Shakedowns and A/V Monitoring

Tales from death row: Justice for Rodney Reed by Caitlin Adams


Each death row visit is monitored in a couple of ways.  We sit in a cubicle with thick glass between us and have to speak over a telephone that's monitored.  And, of course, there are cameras and guards around monitoring us as well.

It's hard to believe that the audio and visual monitoring of all death row visits could have an upside, yet Rodney and I have reached the conclusion that it just might!  


Nicknames

Tales from death row: Justice for Rodney Reed by Caitlin Adams


Shortly after Rodney and I began writing to each other, we both dubbed each other with nicknames.  Mine is Wildflower. After the 100 or so photos of wild flowers, wild places, wild animals I had sent Rodney, it was a delight when he asked if he could call me Wildflower.  


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